What is the best helpline number for Working Tax Credits?

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Working Tax Credits are a benefit designed to assist working people who live on a low income and may not earn enough money to make ends meet.

Who Can Claim Working Tax Credits?

You are able to claim Working Tax Credits if you work more than a specific number of hours per week but still have an income below a certain amount. Within these restrictions, the benefit is not universally available to people under age 25 – only people aged 16-24 with a child and/or a qualifying disability are able to claim it. It is also not possible to claim Working Tax Credit if you are already receiving Universal Credit.

There is a “basic element” which everyone whose claim is accepted is entitled to (which is currently worth up to £1,960 a year). On top of this, there are a number of different “elements” which you may be able to claim some or most of depending on your personal circumstances.

There is a “couple” or “single parent” element (currently worth up to £2,010 per year), another element for those who work a minimum of 30 hours a week (currently worth up to £810 per year), an element for people with a disability and an additional one for people with a severe disability on top of that (currently worth up to £2,970 per year and up to £1,275 per year respectively).

On top of this, there is an element which can be claimed by eligible people who have their children cared for by certain approved childcare providers. Each case is different, find out if you’re eligible by calling the Working Tax Credits number above.

How to Start a Working Tax Credits Claim?

You can open a claim by phoning the Working Tax Credit contact number 8am-8pm Monday to Friday, and 8am-4pm on Saturdays, and phone the same number to report any changes in your circumstances that might affect your claim. It is very important that you do this as soon as you know about such changes, as you could be fined up to £300 if you do not report certain specific changes within 30 days. It is also very important that you are careful to fill in your information accurately, as you could be fined up to £3,000 if you deliberately or carelessly misrepresent your circumstances in certain ways.

You should have your National Insurance Number and any other relevant information – such as the date you start a new job, or the date of expected delivery if you are expecting a baby – to hand when you call the Working Tax Credit helpline.

FAQs

How are Working Tax Credits paid?

Working Tax Credits are paid into a bank or building society account every four weeks from when your claim starts to 5 April every year. You will need to re-apply for your claim every year.

How many hours a week do I need to work to claim Working Tax Credit?

This varies according to your circumstances. Most adults without children aged 25-59 need to work at least 30 hour a week to claim, with disabled people and over-60s needing to work at least 16 hours. Single parents (and those whose partners are unable to work due to disability, in hospital or in prison) need to work at least 16 hours a week, and couples at least 24 hours between them, with one parent working at least 16 hours.

Can I claim Working Tax Credit if I am self-employed?

Many self-employed people are able to claim. However, you must aim to make a profit, work regularly and follow any relevant regulations for the field you work in. You may need to provide additional information to the Tax Office to be able to claim if you earn less than the National Minimum Wage. Call the Working Tax Credit phone number and a helpline representative will be able to answer all your enquiries.

About Working Tax Credits

Postal Address

For claim renewal forms:

HM Revenue and Customs – Tax Credit Office
Comben House
Farriers Way
Netherton
L75 1AX
United Kingdom

For new claim forms:

HM Revenue and Customs – Tax Credit Office
Liverpool
L75 1AZ
United Kingdom

Have a better contact number for Working Tax Credits?